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Like a remake of 'Casablanca' as written by Kafka.
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Transit

In Christian Petzold’s brilliant and haunting modern-day adaptation of Anna Seghers’s 1942 novel, Transit Visa, Georg, a German refugee (Franz Rogowski, Happy End), flees to Marseille assuming the identity of a recently deceased writer whose papers he is carrying. There he delves into the delicate and complex culture of the refugee community, becoming enmeshed in the lives of a young mother and son and falling for a mysterious woman named Marie (Paula Beer, Frantz).

"A stunning work." (Vikram Murthi, RogerEbert.com)

“Takes a brazen, bounding risk right off the bat by stripping its story of any external period trappings, relocating it to a kind of liminal, sunburned present day. [It] ought to make a star of superb leading man Rogowski, whose planed, haunted face lingers in the mind as long as the film’s surfeit of discussion points.” – Guy Lodge, Variety

“TRANSIT refracts its own influences – not just Hitchcock, but also Carol Reed, and noir in general, and Casablanca – through a house of mirrors to get at the decentering truth of being nationally unmoored.” – A. A. Dowd, The A.V. Club

“Like a remake of CASABLANCA as written by Franz Kafka… lucidly traces the specter of fascism (never extinguished, always waiting to exhale), and how unreal it feels for it to cast its shadow across Europe once more.” – David Ehrlich, Indiewire



Played at

Monica Film Center, 3.29.19 - 4.25.19
Music Hall, 3.29.19 - 4.11.19
Glendale, 3.22.19 - 4.04.19
Playhouse 7, 3.15.19 - 4.04.19
Town Center 5, 3.15.19 - 3.28.19
Claremont 5, 3.15.19 - 3.21.19
Royal, 3.08.19 - 3.28.19
Rated NR This film is subtitled This film is subtitled
Runtime: 101 min
Language: German
FEATURED REVIEW: Manohla Dargis, New York Times
The past and present are a terrifying blur in “Transit,” a brilliant allegory set in France that opens amid wailing police sirens. The solitary man in a cafe sipping espresso doesn’t flinch. He is soon joined by a second man who gives him a name: Georg. “Why a...